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Utah Jazz Players Williams-Goss, Brantley Attend Peaceful Protest In Salt Lake City

Nigel Williams-Goss #0 of the Utah Jazz drives past Kevin White #3 of the Adelaide 36ers at Vivint Smart Home Arena on October 5, 2019 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Utah Jazz guard Nigel Williams-Goss and forward Jarrell Brantley attended a peaceful protest in Salt Lake City, according to multiple posts on social media.

One photo of them shows Williams-Goss holding a sign that reads, “We demand change #BLM.”

Brantley retweeted the photo using #BLM, which stands for Black Lives Matter, a movement intended to fight racism.

Yahoo! Sports NBA reporter Chris Haynes posted a photo of Williams-Goss at the protest.

“Utah Jazz guard Nigel Williams-Goss on the grounds this evening in Salt Lake City. After this term, he has one class left at Gonzaga to earn his master’s degree in Organizational Leadership,” read the tweet.

The duo, in addition to other Jazzmen, have been vocal since the death of George Floyd that sparked worldwide protests. George Floyd died after a police officer held his knee on his neck for more than eight minutes. The former officer has been charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter.

Nigel Williams-Goss’ Background And Education

Williams-Goss has one of the most impressive college degrees of any Jazz player in the last 20 years. He received his Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from Gonzaga and was working on his Master’s Degree in Organizational Leadership before making the leap to pro basketball.

Williams-Goss graduated with a 3.8 GPA from the private school and was named an Academic All-American.

Williams-Goss has a white mother and a black father. His mother, Dr. Valerie Williams-Goss, is a doctor of human services and a therapist in private practice. She penned the article for Yahoo! Sports on Friday, May 29.

“My mom, who has her PhD in Human Services (and is white) wrote this article today!” the Jazz guard posted about his mother. “It addresses the role that white people, and all races, can play in helping change our current social climate. THIS is why my mom is my hero!”

“Recently, my son, Nigel Williams Goss, was drafted into the NBA. When word got around that my son played professional basketball, I heard a plethora of racist comments congratulating me for having a white son playing in a predominately black sport. I had to tell countless people that my son is biracial and then used those moments to educate even my racist clients about what their words and behaviors meant to the world and how hurtful they were,” Dr. Williams-Goss wrote.

Other Jazz Players Speak Out About Racial Inequality

Jazz players and coaches have used their platform over the past weeks to speak out about the death of George Floyd, police brutality and racial injustice in the United States and around the world.

Rudy Gobert expressed frustration about police brutality after seeing the video of Floyd’s death.

Donovan Mitchell, arguably the most high profile jazzman, has been very active on Twitter in the fight against racial injustice, encouraging people to speak up.

Another Utah Jazz fan favorite, Jordan Clarkson posted photos and Instagram stories of himself at a protest in Los Angeles.

View this post on Instagram

may 30th 2020

A post shared by Jordan Clarkson (@jordanclarksons) on

Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder acted quickly in joining the NBA Coaches Association’s committee to combat racism, racial profiling and police brutality.

Snyder discussed the committee and his plan to help on Adrian Wojnarowski’s podcast. He recognized that combating racism requires more than just supporting his fellow coaches and players.

“Trying to be transparent with yourself and being a little bit uncomfortable knowing that, you know, in your heart, ‘I’m not a racist,’” Snyder said, “But it’s also about being willing to have that dialogue, to be transparent, to be honest with yourself. And ultimately, I think as a white man, what I was hearing was, we need help.”

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