Share this story...
Latest News

Utah Athletics Participate In Blackout Tuesday Movement Aimed to Amplify Black Voices

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – University of Utah athletic programs are participating in Blackout Tuesday, a movement created to amplify the voices of black people on social media. The premise is to “mute” personal content and in place of it share content from black creators.

You can learn more about the movement below. 

Utah Athletic Teams

Team Twitter and Instagram pages from all over Utah athletics including coaches posted on Tuesday.

Mark Harlan, Director Of Athletics

“Listen. Learn. Act.” Harlan wrote on Twitter.

Utah Football

Kyle Whittingham, Head Football Coach

Kiel McDonald, Running Backs Coach

Fred Whittingham, Tight Ends Coach

Utah Basketball

Lynne Roberts, Women’s Basketball Head Coach

Utah Football Equipment

View this post on Instagram

#BlackOutTuesday

A post shared by Utah Football Equipment (@utes_equipment) on

Utah Volleyball

View this post on Instagram

#BlackoutTuesday

A post shared by University of Utah Volleyball (@utahvolleyball) on

Rich Manning, Women’s Soccer Head Coach

Utah Lacrosse

Utah Track and Field

Student-Athletes

Rylan Jones, Basketball

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday

A post shared by Rylan Jones (@rylanjones15) on

Solomon Enis, Football Wide Receiver

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday

A post shared by Solomon Enis (@s.enis21) on

Britain Covey, Football Wide Receiver

View this post on Instagram

🖤🖤🖤 #blackouttuesday

A post shared by Britain Covey (@brit_covey2) on

Nephi Sewell, Football Linebacker

View this post on Instagram

🗣🗣✊🏽

A post shared by Nephi Sewell (@nephisewell2) on

Timmy Allen, Basketball

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday 🙏🏽✊🏽

A post shared by Timmy Allen (@tz__a) on

Former Student-Athletes

Tyler Huntley

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday🤞🏾🖤💯

A post shared by SNOOP (@_theonlysnoop) on

Demari Simpkins

View this post on Instagram

#blackout2020

A post shared by Demari Simpkins (@gvo_3) on

Isaac Asiata

Former Utah and NFL offensive lineman Isaac Asiata said “Stronger, TOGETHER” on Instagram.

View this post on Instagram

Stronger, TOGETHER 🖤🖤🖤 #BlackOutTuesday

A post shared by Isaac Asiata (@asiatafive4) on

Bradlee Anae

Troy Williams

View this post on Instagram

🖤🖤🙏🏾

A post shared by Troy Williams (@teewillee3) on

Terrell Burgess

“Change must come,” Burgess posted.

View this post on Instagram

Change must come 🖤 #blackouttuesday

A post shared by Terrell Burgess (@tburg98_) on

Devontae Booker

View this post on Instagram

✊🏽#blacklivesmatter #blackouttuesday

A post shared by Devontae Booker (@dbooker_23) on

Josh Nurse

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday ✊🏾✊🏾✊🏾

A post shared by J.Nurse (@officialjnurse) on

Liz Smith, Wife Of Alex Smith

Andy Phillips

Matt Gay

View this post on Instagram

BLM #blackouttuesday

A post shared by Matthew Gay (@mgtweetymonster) on

Kylie Fitts

View this post on Instagram

#blackouttuesday #Together

A post shared by Kylie Fitts (@k_fitts11) on

About Blackout Tuesday

Black Out Tuesday, a movement focused on amplifying the voices of people of color, began in the music industry with Atlantic Records and is spreading across all platforms of social media. Users are posting a black square to their profile, using #blackouttuesday. Organizers and creators are reminding people not to use #blacklivesmatter, as that hashtag is reserved to share information regarding the movement.

The death of George Floyd and the nationwide protests spurred the movement. Floyd was handcuffed and pinned to the ground by a Minnesota police officer. The officer – who has now been fired and arrested – held his knee on Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes on May 25, 2020. The officer involved has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

The movement was started by record executives Jamila Thomas and Brianna Agymang, according to Variety magazine. The movement was originally created using #TheShowMustBePause, but evolved into #blackouttuesday.

“Tuesday, June 2 is meant to intentionally disrupt the work week,” they wrote, “The music industry is a multi-billion dollar industry. And industry that has profited predominantly from Black art. Our mission is to hold the industry at large, including major corporations + their partners who benefit from the efforts, struggles and successes of Black people accountable.”

NBC News contributor and activist, Brittany Packnett Cunningham, posted guidelines to follow for those participating. She guided black people to continue posting while non-black people are encouraged to “mute” but to continue sharing content from people of color. 

View this post on Instagram

🗣BLACK FOLKS, KEEP POSTING. TAG PPL IN THIS POST.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ -Either #TheShowMustBePaused got misunderstood outside of the music industry OR someone co-opted it to suppress Black voices and engage in digital protest suppression. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This does NOT sit right with my spirit & I can’t find a single source post or organizer or black led-organization that started this! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If I’m wrong, I’ll say I’m wrong. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If you are BLACK post a black pic in solidarity, COOL. But do NOT silence yourself for the rest of the day!!!! NOW IS THE TIME OUR VOICES SHOULD BE UP FRONT. Whether you post your pain or joy, ALL of it is resistance because BLACK EXISTENCE IS RESISTANCE. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ IF YOU ARE NOT BLACK, Swipe for instructions on #AmplifyMelanatedVoices for how you can mute YOUR typical content and raise up Black voices. Also see the ORIGINAL #TheShowMustBePaused post-it was NOT this. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Information on social moves so fast and it’s not always vetted. We’ve ALL been there. No judgement-just a loving contribution to consider something different. I love y’all. Let’s get FREE.

A post shared by brittany packnett cunningham (@mspackyetti) on

Trevor Allen is a Utah Utes Insider for KSLSports.com and host of the Crimson Corner podcast. Follow him on Twitter: @TrevorASportsYou can download and listen to the podcast, here.