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FBS ADs Believe There Is A 50 Percent Chance College Football Doesn’t Play Full Season

This is a photo of Rice Eccles Stadium before the start of an college football game against the Utah Utes and Stanford Cardinal on October 7, 2017 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – Roughly one-fifth of Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) athletic directors believe there is at least a 50 percent chance that college football won’t play a full season in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to Stadium’s Brett McMurphy.

In a survey conducted by the sports outlet, “all 130 FBS athletic directors were asked to rank their optimism on the upcoming season being played from “1” (will not be played) to “10” (definitely will be played). Of the 130 ADs contacted during the past week, 112 participated in the anonymous survey.”

When answering the survey, none of the athletic directors responded saying there was a 50/50 chance of no season.

Many of the AD’s “admitted they probably provided a higher-numbered response because they wanted to remain positive and optimistic about having the season.”

These are some of the responses by FBS athletic directors in response to the survey:

  • “There better be (a season) or many programs will be out of business.”
  • “Quite simply, it would be devastating.”
  • “I’m optimistic we’ll have a season but ask me again in May what I think.”
  • “There is still so much to be assessed over the next several months. Concerns with finances, adequate practice for teams, potential looming restrictions in regard to travel to certain states, TV scheduling, the uncertainty of what the stadiums will be — what will be the fans’ perspective of sitting so close to another? You get the idea. I could go on and on and on.”
  • “This has been crazy with high anxiety. The potential financial impact is starting to be understood.”
  • “As of right now, I have no clue if there will be a full season but if we don’t, it will get ugly.”
  • “Most of the Power Five schools wouldn’t miss a beat but it would be devastating to the rest of us.”
  • “If we’re aren’t back (playing) by the fall, it will look like the Great Depression, and we will be in soup lines.”

Earlier in March, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby was on a conference call and said that the next 60-90 days would determine if there was a football season. He also admitted that “the fall is in jeopardy.”

“It’s a whole new ballgame. It affects everything we do,” said Bowlsby on the if there isn’t a season. “It affects the largest portion of our TV contract. If that doesn’t happen, the underpinning of what we know as normal goes away, and we’ll have some major changes to make.”

The first FBS college football games of the 2020 season are scheduled to be played on August 29.

Coronavirus Resources

How Do I Prevent It?

The CDC has some simple recommendations, most of which are the same for preventing other respiratory illnesses or the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with people who may be sick
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Stay home when you are sick
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. Always wash your hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

The CDC does not recommend wearing a face mask respirator to protect yourself from coronavirus unless a healthcare professional recommends it.

How To Get Help

If you’re worried you may have COVID-19, you can contact the Utah Coronavirus Information Line at 1-800-456-7707 to speak to trained healthcare professionals. You can also use telehealth services through your healthcare providers.

Additional Resources

If you see evidence of PRICE GOUGING, the Utah Attorney General’s Office wants you to report it. Common items in question include toilet paper, water, hand sanitizer, certain household cleaners, and even cold medicine and baby formula. Authorities are asking anyone who sees price gouging to report it to the Utah Division of Consumer Protection at 801-530-6601 or 800-721-7233. The division can also be reached by email at consumerprotection@utah.gov.

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