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Alex Smith #11 of the Washington Redskins runs the ball for a nine yard gain during the fourth quarter against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Raymond James Stadium on November 11, 2018 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Will Vragovic/Getty Images)
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Alex Smith Hopes To Play In NFL Again

Alex Smith #11 of the Washington Redskins runs the ball for a nine yard gain during the fourth quarter against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Raymond James Stadium on November 11, 2018 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Will Vragovic/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Former Utah quarterback Alex Smith is working his way back to health after suffering a horrific leg injury last season.

During last season’s Week 11 game against the Houston Texans, Smith, a member of the Washington Redskins, went down with a gruesome injury after a brutal sack by Kareem Jackson and J.J. Watt. The injury was quite similar to one suffered by another Redskins QB, Joe Theismann, exactly 33 years earlier to the day.

Smith suffered a compound and spiral fracture in both his tibia and fibula in his right leg and is doubtful to return at any point next season. As a result, the Redskins drafted Ohio State QB Dwayne Haskins in the first round, thus complicating Smith’s future with the team.

Despite the difficult situation and painful recovery, Smith was upbeat when discussing his journey with a Angie Goff, a Washington-based television reporter, on her podcast, Oh My Goff.

While the two received a massage at the mall (yes, really), Smith told Goff that he plans on continuing his NFL career when he gets back to full strength. He’s been going through physical therapy and has even gone golfing while wearing a large supportive apparatus on his leg. Getting back to the NFL is a priority for the former Ute, who finished fourth in the Heisman voting back in 2004.

“That’s the plan,” Smith said. “That’s the plan. Steps. I’ve got to conquer some more steps before I get there. Learn to run again. That’s a big one. I’m already throwing. I already feel like throwing is not a problem. I feel like I can throw. But dropping, moving around, all that kind of stuff, change of direction.”

While Smith’s cast, which looks like something out of a bad steampunk movie, can be cumbersome as he’s worn it non-stop for what will be a total of seven and a half months, he’s grateful for the device.

“Believe it or not, this thing is going to save my leg, save my bone, allow me to heal and walk again and hopefully play football again,” he said.