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Head coach Quin Snyder of the Utah Jazz shouts instructrions to his team as they play the Denver Nuggets at the Pepsi Center on November 3, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
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What Went Wrong In The Jazz’s Fourth Quarter Collapse Against Orlando

Head coach Quin Snyder of the Utah Jazz shouts instructrions to his team as they play the Denver Nuggets at the Pepsi Center on November 3, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – It was a rough fourth quarter for the Utah Jazz in a 96-89 loss to the Orlando Magic.

Considering that they were winning going into the fourth quarter, something that is usually a good indication of a forthcoming victory, the Jazz’s collapse against the Magic was especially hard to swallow.

Jazz Usually Closed Games Well

Coming into the game in Mexico City on Saturday, the Jazz were 13-2 when leading going into the fourth quarter. In that same situation, they were 8-1 on the road (the game in Mexico was considered a road game for Utah, the designated visiting team).

The Jazz led 59-55 going into the fourth but allowed the Magic to score 41 points in the final period to control the final 12 minutes.

‘Unacceptable’ Fourth Quarter

After the game, Jazz center Derrick Favors was less than pleased about what happened in the end.

“You’ve got to give them credit because they’re a good team with some good players, but to score 41 points in the fourth quarter, that’s unacceptable,” said Jazz forward Derrick Favors, who posted 21 points and eight rebounds. “We’ve just got to figure that out.”

What Went Wrong

The Jazz had been struggling to shoot the ball all game, but had forced 19 turnovers by Orlando in the first three periods. That allowed Utah, who was shooting at poor clip of 29.4 percent to take 12 more shots than Orlando which accounted for the Jazz’s slim lead.

In the fourth quarter however, the Magic, led by Terrence Ross, who had 10 points in the quarter, had the ball on a string. They committed just three turnovers in the period and gave up just four points on those giveaways.

The Magic also took the lid off the bucket and poured in the points. They shot a fantastic 75 percent from the field, including 5-of-7 shots from beyond the arc. The Jazz missed all seven of their 3-point attempts and continued to shoot poorly from the field at 38.1 percent in the quarter.

Despite The Loss, It Was A Good Experience

It was a painful loss for the Jazz, but they still enjoyed their international experience, the first regular season game outside of the United States and Canada in the team’s history.

“It’s a great experience to be here to play, and I wish we would’ve played better and won, but we’re happy we had the opportunity to play in Mexico City,” said Jazz coach Quin Snyder